CALL FOR ACTION


Advocates for Equitable Design Education (AEDE) is a student-run collective at the University of Calgary’s School of Architecture, Landscape, and Planning (SAPL), which is dedicated to the advancement of critical pedagogy in design and recovery of dialogues minimized in current design practices.

︎︎︎ VOLUNTEER WITH US  
︎︎︎ SIGN THE PLEDGE

OUR MANIFESTO


Advocates for Equitable Design Education (AEDE) is a student-run collective at the University of Calgary’s School of Architecture, Landscape, and Planning (SAPL), which is dedicated to the advancement of critical pedagogy in design and recovery of dialogues minimized in current design practices.

︎︎︎ READ MORE

UPCOMING EVENT:
FIELD NOTES READING CLUB


November 28, 2020 @ 11:00AM MST
REGISTER HERE



“Why does art historical research inform us about the sexual orientation of artists such as Leonardo da Vinci, but architectural historians rarely mention the homosexuality of architects who were active in the past? Why does architectural history remain silent when art history is so valuable?”

With these questions, Voigt and Bersan begin to challenge the queer space within the architectural realm. When space is designed to comfort a specific gender/genders, unwelcome sexual orientations will know. Others may not notice, understand, or feel it, but those excluded will know; they are not welcome. We, as designers, have to stop the one-sided built environment and gradually bring in gender diversity to stop isolating people based on their sexual orientation and gender identity(ies).

WATCH/LISTEN


Episode 2 of Field Talks is out!



Episode 1 of Field Talks is out!



October 22, 2020
Field Theories - Whose City?




︎︎︎View more past event recordings here



COMPETITION(S)









AEDE is proud to announce our partnership with Center for Civilization, UCalgary SAPL, UCalgary, and Stantec as they launch the CBDX: CITIES FOR ALL International design ideas competition! OPEN TO ALL: STUDENTS AND PROFESSIONALS; INDIVIDUALS AND TEAMS.

This international design ideas competition—the first in the CBDX series—asks, What does a city for all look like? How does it operate and function? How can it come into being? What place, structure, thing, system, process, or relationship must be forged to engender a more just and equitable ‘city for all’? And in particular—this is perhaps the most crucial question—the competition asks, How are these aims navigated by, through, and with the current uncertainty wrought by the ongoing global pandemic and the long-term existential threats of environmental degradation and climate change?

This is the year a wide-ranging set of inequities—that have always been there—have been brought to bear. The only difference is that now a significantly larger percentage of the public, and wider society, has become aware of how urgent addressing these issues are. As various movements have demonstrated, such as Black Lives Matter, the time to act is now.

Thus, this competition asks entrants to consider how matters of equity and activism, ecology and environment, and health and wellness might converge—and unfold—within our future cities.

NEWS & UPDATES